General Interest

What Can Older Pastors Learn from U.S. Presidents?

By February 8, 2016 No Comments

By Warren Bird

carter in office

After an American president’s term of office ends, is whatever comes next a step down professionally and a let down personally? The recent historical pattern is perhaps a surprise: many have poured themselves into a new mission, and with amazing results.

That same question could be framed of older, long-term pastors still brimming with ministry heart, skills and connections: is there meaningful life after stepping out of your current role? My research says yes. 

If your church is anticipating succession in the next few years, let us help you walk through the stages of preparation and transition — on May 3-4, 2016, in Houston. CLICK HERE to tell us about your situation, and then we’ll contact you.

Outgoing presidents have survived the crushing pace, stress, and even food diets of a presidential campaign followed by four or more years in arguably one of the most stressful jobs in the world. Lately, not only do they develop a new life, but they tend to outlive the rest of us, so they’re at that “new” life for a long time.

Jimmy Carter, now 91, has taken his place in history as the president who has lived the longest after leaving the White House – 34 years so far. He’s done everything from championing Habitat for Humanity to teaching to writing 21 books about, among other things, how to find a second career! “When I got out of the White House,” Carter recalled, “I had a life expectancy of 25 [more] years, and so I needed to figure out how to use it.” (See Time magazine’s “Why Do Presidents Live So Long?”)

carter center2Ronald Reagan lived until 93, as did Gerald Ford. George Bush the elder is 91. Even in the 19th century, when the average man died at age 47, U.S. presidents lived an average of 69 years.

The application: outgoing presidents have leveraged their reputations, connections and skills to do good. Herbert Hoover engineered an immense humanitarian rescue effort in the years after World War II, Ford and Carter partnered to promote reform and democracy. George W. Bush has focused on veterans. They leveraged their fame for a cause they believe in.

Pastors can do likewise. I’ve seen long-term pastors shift over to strategic roles in global missions, teaching, mentoring of other pastors, fundraising for ministry, and more. And they’ve transitioned in a way that’s a win for their families, for their churches, and for the Kingdom of God.

 

 

Related Posts

Warren Bird

Author Warren Bird

Warren Bird, Ph.D. has been named a Leadership Network Senior Fellow in light of his exemplary service 2006-2018 as Director of Research and Intellectual Capital Development at Leadership Network. He serves as full-time VP of Research for ECFA.org (Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability). An ordained minister with background as both a pastor and seminary professor, Warren is an award-winning author or co-author of 31 books for ministry leaders including Hero Maker with Dave Ferguson, How to Break Church Growth Barriers with Carl George, and Next: Pastoral Succession that Works with William Vanderbloemen. Other recent titles are Better Together: Making Church Mergers Work with Jim Tomberlin, and Wisdom from Lyle E. Schaller. Some of Warren’s recent online reports include "Leadership Network/Generis Multisite Church Scorecard," and "The Heartbeat of Rising Influence Churches." See also research reports at leadnet.org/megachurchleadnet.org/salary and leadnet.org/portable. He is widely recognized as one of the nation's leading researchers of megachurches, multisite churches, large church compensation and high-visibility pastoral succession. He also oversees the world's only active, sortable list of global megachurches. Follow him on Twitter @warrenbird.  Click here to subscribe to Leadership Network Advance to get updates from Leadership Network.

More posts by Warren Bird

Your spot has been saved!

You will receive an e-mail shortly with more details about the webinar. Please watch your inbox.